Managing & Management in a Challenging Reality black icon The Action-Reaction Cycle by Michael Tsur Michael Tsur Profile Picture This unique course will highlight different aspects of the human behavior, and how they affect interactions and negotiations.

We will learn how to implement a method for well-based reactions,

preventing noises and interference which can demage the negotiation process.

  Watch The Preview Buy Now for $49 6 Lessons 48 Minutes of Video Content Unlimited Viewes for 3 Month Access on
Mobile and TV
More Details
Managing & Management in a Challenging Reality black icon
6 Lessons     |      Course Duration: 48 Minutes     |      3 Month License
6  |  48  |   3 Month
Included for FREE! $9 Worth
Course Summary
In this course you will be exposed to three basic elements that influence the inter-personal interaction, whether we are dealing with a short term random or long term relations. The first element is trust, which form the base for any relationship. The second is the sense of rejection, and the ways for dealing with it, and the third is the must for validation. This course is about understanding these elements using basic methodologies and deep insights regarding our negotiation parties and through these bringing the negotiation into a successful track. The understanding of these principles enables us to manage an effective professional negotiation, in contrary to the intuitive and emotional process that we are used to, that can be destructive to the process.
What you'll learn
  • Analyzing situations during negotiation, and respond in a structured way
  • The importance of different factors in relationships, which affects negotiations
  • Work situations which surprises us, or caught us "unprepared", and still make the best out of them
Syllabus
Description In this course you will be exposed to three basic elements that influence the inter-personal interaction, whether we are dealing with a short term random or long term relations. The first element is trust, which form the base for any relationship. The second is the sense of rejection, and the ways for dealing with it, and the third is the must for validation. This course is about understanding these elements using basic methodologies and deep insights regarding our negotiation parties and through these bringing the negotiation into a successful track. The understanding of these principles enables us to manage an effective professional negotiation, in contrary to the intuitive and emotional process that we are used to, that can be destructive to the process.
Objectives Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  • Learn & understand the importance of different factors in relationships, which affects the negotiation process
  • Get tools allowing real-time analysis of different situations during negotiation, and respond to them in a structured way
  • Work situations which surprises us, or caught us "unprepared", and still make the best out of them
Course Modules
The course includes the following modules:
  • 1.  Necessity of Trust
    The basis for every relationship, no matter its length or quality, is trust. When trying to establish effective cooperation, trust becomes more important as the levels of risk and stress increases. The purpose of this lesson is to illustrate the importance of trust as the basis for any type of communications, including for negotiation processes in our day-to-day lives.
  • 2.  Sense of Rejection
    The sense of rejection we feel from time to time is a part of our day-to-day lives, and strengthens with the emergence of new technologies and our dependence upon them. We tend to attribute every experience of rejection into a personal attention, and many times perceive it as intentional. The lesson has two goals: first, learn how to be aware and identify the sense of rejection. Then, we will learn how to deal with the sense of rejection, and more importantly with the distractions it creates.
  • 3.  Importance of Validation
    The essence of validation is a supplementary measure to the trust that stands at the basis of every relationship. Our ability to validate our actions and choices is a condition for being professional, whether it is a professional, parental, or friendship relationship. The purpose of this lesson is to explain the importance of validation, first for ourselves, and then to our colleagues, including the legitimacy of mistakes and misunderstandings, as long as we keep relationships going in our challenging environment.
  • 4.  The Flat World Theory
    The flat world theory is also based on the technological revolution in which we live, and the huge amount of data that we receive on a daily basis, that part of it, sometimes a major part, disturbs our decision making process. The purpose of this lesson is to reduce the amount of influence of these disturbances, getting to know the TMI (too much information) phoneme trying to minimize its effect on us and especially on our trust, with the main goal of restoring the faith we should hold while receiving though decisions during negotiation process.
  • 5.  The New Reality
    As a direct continuation to non-stop information flooding, which typically characterized in its negative and chaotic aspects, we find ourselves in a reality in which the level of trust decreased and the level of fear increased. Due to this fear, this reality limits our ability to make educated decisions. This lesson purpose is to bring the awareness to this issue, its prevalence and intensity, with the purpose to balance the tension between the rational and the emotional.
  • 6.  Deeper Thoughts on Trust
    The action-reaction cycle bring us back to the simple fact that in the basis of every relation lays trust, that without it nothing will happen. Although we can start to establish trust simply by smiling or shake hands, we have to keep building it using additional resources that are required in order to continue with the negotiation processes during which we make decisions that can change our state. The purpose of this lesson is to understand the method of pushing us using a “one-time offer” and continue with the orderly process of negotiation, even when we think we might lose this “opportunity”.
Take This Course